Thursday, February 27, 2020

The Criminal Justice System Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 words

The Criminal Justice System - Essay Example The study presents Theoretical Criminology that refers to a discipline focusing on the establishment, development, and the advancement of the theoretical, speculative, or notional aspects of criminological knowledge. In other terms, theoretical criminology encompasses the various theories, crimes, and the narratives related to or explaining crime and delinquency. In addition, theoretical criminology entails the study and surveys of criminal/delinquent behaviors, criminal law, social deviance, morality, and social regulation/governance crimes/criminals. Besides the renewal of healthy theoretical debates in the criminal justice systems, theoretical criminology explores the interrelation of criminological theories and empirical data from crime-focused researches, thereby promoting the establishment of linkages between cultural, socio-political theories, and criminological analysis. Although the academic nature of criminal justice became more apparent in the 1950s, a period during the di scipline was mainly characterized by observational researches; recent times have realized the diversification of the discipline, with more complex criminal justice systems, organizations, and agents/personnel. Consequently, the criminological theories have since evolved to become more complex and equally diversified in their elements and areas of applicability. In fact, the contemporary theories of criminology could not be easily identified with the theoretical criminology that existed fifty years ago. ... Theoretical Criminology Theoretical Criminology refers to a discipline focusing on the establishment, development, and the advancement of the theoretical, speculative, or notional aspects of criminological knowledge (Walsh & Ellis, 2007). In other terms, theoretical criminology encompasses the various theories, crimes, and the narratives related to or explaining crime and delinquency (Beccaria & Davies, 1974). In addition, theoretical criminology entails the study and surveys of criminal/delinquent behaviors, criminal law, social deviance, morality, and social regulation/governance crimes/criminals. Besides the renewal of healthy theoretical debates in the criminal justice systems, theoretical criminology explores the interrelation of criminological theories and empirical data from crime-focused researches, thereby promoting the establishment of linkages between cultural, socio-political theories, and criminological analysis. Although the academic nature of criminal justice became mo re apparent in the 1950s, a period during the discipline was mainly characterized by observational researches; recent times have realized the diversification of the discipline, with more complex criminal justice systems, organizations, and agents/personnel. Consequently, the criminological theories have since evolved to become more complex and equally diversified in their elements and areas of applicability. In fact, the contemporary theories of criminology could not be easily identified with the theoretical criminology that existed fifty years ago. With the more complex theoretical researches accumulated in the last sixty years, relatively more specific criminological theories have been postulated. Most of these specific criminological theories explain various types of

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